City of Vienna

logoGEF City of Vienna

Vienna is the capital and largest city of Austria, and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's primary city, with a population of nearly 1.8 million * (2.6 million within the metropolitan area, more than 20% of Austria's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union and it is the second city to Berlin in terms of German speakers. Vienna is composed of 23 districts (Bezirke). Administrative district offices in Vienna serve functions similar to those in the other states, the officers being subject to the Landeshauptmann, which in Vienna is the mayor. In 2001, the city centre was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Vienna is located in north-eastern Austria, at the easternmost extension of the Alps in the Vienna basin, close to the borders of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. The city spans both sides of the Danube river. It covers an area of circa 830 km2 (415 city, 395 land, 19 water), with a density of about 4000 inhabitants per square km. Elevation ranges from 151 to 524 m. Vienna lies within a transition of oceanic climate and humid continental climate, and features an oceanic climate. The city has warm summers with average high temperatures of 24 to 33 C, with maximum exceeding 38 C and lows of around 17 C. Winters are relatively dry and cold with average temperatures at about freezing point. Spring and autumn are mild. Precipitation is generally moderate throughout the year, averaging 550 mm annually, with considerable local variations. Industries are located mostly in the southern and eastern districts. The inner city is situated away from the main flow of the Danube, but is bounded by the Danube canal. Vienna's second and twentieth districts are located between the Danube canal and the Danube river. Across the Danube and in the southern areas are the newest parts of the city (districts 2123). The global energy consumption of Vienna in 2012 (after energy conversion losses) was 38,24 GWh (137,67 TJ) subdivided approximately as follows: 7,98 GWh (21%) gas, 8,39 GWh (22%) electricity, 6,32 GWh (17%) district heating, 1,9 GWh (5%) renewables and 12,65 GWh (33%) fuels. Energy consumed by private households corresponds to circa 32%, with transportation having a quota of 36% and the remaining 23% for services and 9% for production and agriculture . The city of Vienna was chosen as a case study city because of its ambitious goals with Vienna is the capital and largest city of Austria, and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's primary city, with a population of nearly 1.8 million (2.6 million within the metropolitan area, more than 20% of Austria's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union and it is the second city to Berlin in terms of German speakers. Vienna is composed of 23 districts (Bezirke). Administrative district offices in Vienna serve functions similar to those in the other states, the officers being subject to the Landeshauptmann, which in Vienna is the mayor. In 2001, the city centre was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Vienna is located in north-eastern Austria, at the easternmost extension of the Alps in the Vienna basin, close to the borders of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. The city spans both sides of the Danube river. It covers an area of circa 830 km2 (415 city, 395 land, 19 water), with a density of about 4000 inhabitants per square km. Elevation ranges from 151 to 524 m. Vienna lies within a transition of oceanic climate and humid continental climate, and features an oceanic climate. The city has warm summers with average high temperatures of 24 to 33 C, with maximum exceeding 38 C and lows of around 17 C. Winters are relatively dry and cold with average temperatures at about freezing point. Spring and autumn are mild. Precipitation is generally moderate throughout the year, averaging 550 mm annually, with considerable local variations. Industries are located mostly in the southern and eastern districts. The inner city is situated away from the main flow of the Danube, but is bounded by the Danube canal. Vienna's second and twentieth districts are located between the Danube canal and the Danube river. Across the Danube and in the southern areas are the newest parts of the city (districts 2123). The global energy consumption of Vienna in 2012 (after energy conversion losses) was 38,24 GWh (137,67 TJ) subdivided approximately as follows: 7,98 GWh (21%) gas, 8,39 GWh (22%) electricity, 6,32 GWh (17%) district heating, 1,9 GWh (5%) renewables and 12,65 GWh (33%) fuels. Energy consumed by private households corresponds to circa 32%, with transportation having a quota of 36% and the remaining 23% for services and 9% for production and agriculture**. The city of Vienna was chosen as a case study city because of its ambitious goals with regards to energy efficiency and sustainable development. The Smart City Wien framework strategy, adopted in 2014 by the Vienna City Council, contains ambitious goals, such as to reduce by 2050 private motor transport by half, to generate 50% of energy from renewable sources and to reduce energy consumption on an ongoing basis***. regards to energy efficiency and sustainable development. The Smart City Wien framework strategy, adopted in 2014 by the Vienna City Council, contains ambitious goals, such as to reduce by 2050 private motor transport by half, to generate 50% of energy from renewable sources and to reduce energy consumption on an ongoing basis***

  • Sources : * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna
  • ** http://www.wien.gv.at/stadtentwicklung/energieplanung/pdf/energieflussbild-2012.pdf
  • *** https://smartcity.wien.gv.at/site/en/initiative/rahmenstrategie/